Report Paints Grim Picture of Dangers for Mothers Giving Birth in the U.S.

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Report Paints Grim Picture of Dangers for Mothers Giving Birth in the U.S.

Data Shows U.S. Is Most Dangerous Place For A Mother To Give Birth

According to the CDC, at least 700 women die every year from pregnancy or childbirth and 50,000 mothers suffer unimaginable injuries. Those shocking statistics support a July 2018 USA Today report that identified the U.S. as the most dangerous place to give birth in the developed world. The researchers became interested in the issue after Germany, France, Japan, Canada and the U.K. saw between 5 and 10 maternal deaths per 100,000 births between 1990 and 2015, the U.S. rate rose sharply to 26.4 deaths during the same period. Worse though is that nearly most U.S. hospitals are doing little to prevent or change those outcomes and making deadly mistakes, including several located in Kentucky.

USA TODAY Report Findings:

  • Researchers collected more than a half-million pages of internal hospital quality data and reviewed mothers who experienced awful deliveries.
  • Dozens of birthing hospitals were also asked if they always follow recommended procedures and track how and why terribly wrong delivery experiences occur.
  • The conclusions were made that safety recommendations are being ignored and failure to protect new mothers is running ramped in health systems and hospitals across the nation.

In Kentucky, the maternal mortality average rate is 7.7 per 100,000 live births per most recent data (2010).

Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Strategies to Reduce Maternal Deaths

More than half of maternal deaths or injuries could be reduced or eliminated with better systems in place to identify issues and confident proactive care to prevent injury and saving a mom’s life will be provided by health systems, clinicians including nurses and medical support staff. The Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family has identified four strategies to lessen the maternal death and injury rate throughout the Commonwealth.

  1. Universal routine preconception and prenatal screening for depression, substance abuse, and domestic violence with appropriate referrals.
  2. Provide access to early entry into prenatal care regardless of income status.
  3. Promote continuing education of all health professionals to enhance their knowledge of complications of pregnancy with early identification and acceptable medical management and referrals when indicated.
  4. Continued support of the Maternal Mortality Review Committee in investigation of all maternal deaths and pregnancy associated maternal deaths in Kentucky. The Committee identifies major contributing factors in maternal deaths and develops appropriate interventions for education of health care professionals and the public.

Most maternal death reporting is done through voluntary submission to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Pregnancy Mortality Surveillance System.

Owensboro and Madisonville Medical Malpractice Lawyers — No Recovery, No Fee

With offices in Owensboro and Madisonville, Rhoads & Rhoads represents medical malpractice victims throughout Western Kentucky at time when hospital groups and practitioners need to be held accountable. We offer free initial consultations, and all cases are taken on a contingency fee basis, which mean there is no payment required up front. We get paid only if we win or settle your case, so there is NO RISK involved.

Call us at 888-709-9329 or contact us by e-mail to schedule an appointment with one of our Madisonville or Owensboro personal injury attorneys.

About the Author:

Chris Rhoads is a partner in the firm’s Owensboro office and has been practicing law since 1996. He practiced law in the firm of Woodward, Hobson & Fulton in Lexington, Kentucky in its trial practice and product liability litigation section for five years before joining Rhoads and Rhoads in 2000.

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